Summary of Eye on Sacramento’s Transparency and Budgetary Reforms

June 12, 2012

Transparency Reform Proposals

EOS Reform #1Post the city’s organizational chart on-line.  The chart should list every city job position and the name and contact information of every city employee other than lower level employees whose jobs involve no interaction with the public.  Without such information, the public frequently has no clue whom to contact in the city hierarchy when they have a problem.

EOS Reform #2:  Post the city’s check book and other payments on-line in Excel format so that the public can see for themselves how every city dollar (general fund and enterprise funds) is being spent.  City activists and enterprising local media will pour over these records and seek out explanations for payments that strike them as potentially inappropriate.  When city check writers know that every check they write and payment they authorize will be scrutinized by the public, they will be on their best behavior.

EOS Reform #3:  Post all credit card charges and itemized travel expenditures of city council members and city staff on-line, which will ensure that public eye balls are on this most commonly misused and abused form of spending by city officials.

EOS Reform #4: Post the expenditures that city council members make out of their individual $55,000 annual discretionary accounts on the council member’s city web page.  These funds are designed to give council members some flexibility in funding local needs without going through the formal city budget process.  There is a public perception that such accounts are being misused by some council members as slush funds to advance members’ political interests.  By posting such expenditures on a council member’s web page for all to see, the funds will be less likely to be spent in self-aggrandizing ways (i.e. golf tournaments, electronic toys).

EOS Reform #5: Post all campaign contributions to a council member on that council member’s city web page so that the public can see at a glance who has invested money in each of our elected officials.  Currently such information is only available through a portal on the city clerk’s web site which is difficult to find and cumbersome to navigate.

EOS Reform #6: Create a Twitter feed for real time public comments on the action at live city council meetings and place the feed on the city council’s web page along side streaming video of council meetings, making such comments part of the public record of council meetings.  A live Twitter feed for council meetings would allow members of the public to share comments, interact with one another and raise public engagement in the policy-making process to a new level.

EOS Reform #7:  Seek city council approval for placement on the November 2012 ballot of an initiative creating an independent city redistricting commission.   This is a proposal being jointly developed by Eye on Sacramento and Empower Sacramento, a coalition of ethnic groups and leaders organized in the aftermath of the council’s redistricting decision.  Removing council members’ power to draw their own council district lines and shifting that power to an independent redistricting commission will protect the public interest from being subordinated to the narrow and often self-serving political interests of incumbent politicians.

EOS Reform #8:  Adopt an ordinance that prohibits the approval of any major contract and any labor contract until at least 14 days after its terms have been fully disclosed to the public via media release and prominently posted on the city’s web site, coupled with city staff’s good faith projections of both the short-term and long-term total costs to the city of such contract, as well as specific disclosures of the assumptions that underlie staff’s cost projections.  These disclosures will give the media and the public the time and opportunity to scrutinize and comment on the fairness of labor contracts to the city and its taxpayers.  With labor costs now constituting close to 80% of the city’s general fund budget, public scrutiny of proposed pacts is vital to democratic governance in the city.

EOS Reform #9: Require city employees who testify at city council hearings to be sworn.  Regular and close council observers have witnessed occasions, albeit rare, in which city staff making statements or presentations to council have been less than fully candid in their remarks, sometimes spinning or shading the facts or professing ignorance of embarrassing or uncomfortable matters, typically to avoid upsetting one or more council members.  To assure that the council and the public have the benefit of candid, independent and impartial information and advice from staff, city staff statements to council should be sworn under penalty of perjury to be the whole and complete truth.

Budgetary Reform Proposal

EOS Reform #10:  Adopt an ordinance that prohibits the city from entering into multi-year labor agreements.  In recent years, the city council has been unable to effectively manage its labor costs due to the existence of multi-year labor agreements.  A city bound by multi-year labor agreements can only close deficits by threatening unions with lay-offs to secure needed labor cost concessions.  The practice has led to the decimation of city services in department after department.  Barring multi-year labor pacts will preserve the council’s vital fiscal flexibility to reduce labor costs through negotiation and, if need be, mediation and arbitration.  The city should end the practice of savaging city service levels as a response to union intransigence.  A less preferable, but acceptable alternative, would be to limit the term of labor pacts to not more than two years.

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About Craig Powell

Craig Powell is an attorney, businessman and community activist. He serves as President of Eye on Sacramento